No Really, Trust Me: Pan’s Review of Loki: Agent of Asgard #13

At long last, here comes Verity to save the day! But I’m getting ahead of myself; last you all heard in #12, Loki was still tied up and on fire as Future Loki explained the immutability of fate. That condition persists, but now with the understanding that said fire is metaphorical fire, and in the conflagration, Loki is confronting the specters of eir former selves as future Loki goes right on cackling, like he do. In the dreary headspace Loki finds emself in, Original Loki and Kid Loki both wait, swathed in an eerie green glow, to give em life advice.

What's a group of Lokis called? A murder? A fib? A failure?

What’s a group of Lokis called? A murder? A fib? A failure?

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Fanfiction Fridays: see me now by seventhswan

Big Hero 6 has quickly become a favorite in my household, and I was struck during a recent re-re-rewatch with the realization that fanfic shipping Honey Lemon and Gogo might be a thing that exists. AO3 quickly validated me by providing not just one, but a number of delightful femslash fics. Of all these, I especially loved seventhswan’s see me now.

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Home is Nothing to Write Home About

home movieWhen it was announced that The True Meaning of Smekday was going to be made into a movie called Home, I was beyond excited. The True Meaning of Smekday is a fun book about an alien invasion that’s actually about colonialism and imperialism, and it stars Gratuity “Tip” Tucci, a biracial girl who, along with her cat and an alien Boov friend, saves the Earth. How cool would it be to see this on the big screen?!

Well, as it turns out, it wasn’t that cool. As an adaptation, Home fails on almost every conceivable level. It’s no longer about colonialism or imperialism except in the most shallow of ways, and what’s worse, Tip can no longer truly be called our protagonist. However, because the plot of the movie is so different from the plot of the book, I think it’s worthwhile to judge the movie on its own merits, and write a post comparing the two when I’ve seen the movie again or when the DVD comes out. Unfortunately, as a Hollywood film, Home turned out to be a predictable, only casually funny, dull movie.

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Throwback Thursdays: Star Wars Animated Adventures: Ewoks

I used to love Star Wars Animated Adventures: Ewoks as a child. As a young girl, how could I not have a special place in my heart for the Ewoks? They’re cuddly woodland bear people who play a significant role in the Rebels’ defeat of the Empire during Return of the Jedi. Using nothing more than sticks and rocks, the Ewoks manage to kill both a bunch of Stormtoopers that had superior technology and any viewer’s suspension of disbelief. By the war’s end, the Ewoks also become good friends with our Rebel heroes. Then, they all sit down together at a campfire to cannibalize the Stormtroopers who just died while happy music plays in the background. Of course I adored them.

Look at them. Obviously, they hunger for human flesh.

Look at them. Obviously, they hunger for human flesh.

So when I first encountered Ewoks back in the mid-90s, I fell in love almost immediately. Now, nearly twenty years later, I had forgotten that Ewoks existed. At least that was the case until I saw that Lady Geek Girl owned a copy of it on DVD. And well, much like Saika’s experience in revisiting A Troll in Central Park, I have discovered that some things from my childhood are really not as good as I remember them. There’s no nice way to put this: Ewoks is just bad.

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The “Lovable Asshole” Trope and Sexism

I tend to fall in love most with a certain type of character, and those characters are usually assholes. Oh yes, sometimes there are exceptions like Scott McCall in Teen Wolf, who is practically a literal Disney prince, but most of the time I love the asshole characters. Usually this is because I find them hilarious and I love that they don’t seem to give a fuck about what anyone thinks of them.

Jayne CobbAnd let’s be honest, there is a reason that we love characters like this. To some extent we all wish we could get away with saying exactly what we are thinking, no matter how awful it is, and not give a fuck about any of the consequences that comes from that. But we still want to be liked, and we certainly do not want to be evil (not necessarily anyway) and thus we get the Lovable Asshole trope. The character who doesn’t give a fuck and makes hilarious quips about people they don’t like, but everyone still loves them for the most part, even if they know they’re a bit of an asshole. Characters like Deadpool, Jayne Cobb, and Iron Man fulfill this trope to a tee. I usually think these characters are awesome and they certainly have an interesting amount of complexity to them. Sometimes, though, this awesome trope can be used for evil. And by evil I mean that writers can use these characters to make prejudice and bigotry seem cool and acceptable.

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Web Crush Wednesdays: Bisexual Books

webcrush picRecently there’s been an article going around about reading non-white, non-male authors for a year, just to see how one’s worldview might change, and while there has been some pushback, most people (at least in my experience) have recognized it as a worthwhile challenge. At the very least, it’s certainly a teachable moment for people who wouldn’t have considered this otherwise. But, if you’re playing along at home, how should you go about finding these books? The good thing is, there are a number of sites that already cater to diversity: Diversity in YA and Disability in Kidlit are just a couple. Now there’s another one: Bisexual Books.

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Faith in the Night: Review of Such a Dark Thing: Theology of the Vampire Narrative in Popular Culture

RESOURCE_TemplateI was thrilled when I got the chance to read M. Jess Peacock’s Such a Dark Thing: Theology of the Vampire Narrative in Popular Culture and review this academic treatise for our blog. Just seeing the title itself filled me with nerdy joy and anticipation. This is not the first time I’ve written about vampires and religion for this blog, and I hope it won’t be my last. Such intersections of fantastical genre pop culture media and religious studies/theology perfectly fits in with some of my own dearest interests, as well as the mission of the LGG&F blog, of course. The book does exactly what it says it will, looking at the symbolic value of the vampire in pop culture through a variety of theological lenses, some of which I’d thought of before, but many of which had never crossed my mind. Without further ado, let’s sink our teeth into this review (I’m sorry, I couldn’t resist #punsarealwaysintended).

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