My Current Choice for Stimulating Brain Food: The Television Series iZombie

I Zombie Premiere ImageDespite being interested in the horror genre, I’ve never been a fan of zombies, especially now that they’ve been used to death in movies, games, and even clothing. When my boyfriend suggested watching iZombie, I originally said no. But he told me that the pilot episode was supposed to be really good, and I was sick of marathoning Game of Thrones, so we watched it together. Since the pilot, we’ve been keeping up with the show online. It’s become one of my favorite shows currently airing. iZombie is surprisingly progressive, in a strong but subtle way. The cast is diverse in a respectful manner, and the plot touches on racial issues in the media. The main protagonist is an independent woman, without having to prove herself. iZombie may not be the most intense show, but it’s clever, civil, and it covers modern problems in an entertaining way.

Spoilers ahead! If you’re curious, you can watch most of the series for free on the CW’s webpage, or on Hulu.

iZombie is loosely based off the comic of the same name, published in 2010. The head artist for the comic book series, Michael Allred, created the opening and cut scenes for the show.

A scene from the opening  credits.

A scene from the opening credits.

The show is about Liv Moore, a medical student who changes into a zombie after a party one night. She loses motivation with her life, and doesn’t socialize with anyone for months. Liv stops working as a medical resident and breaks off her engagement. Soon she starts working at the town morgue, where her boss allows her to eat brains as he studies a way to cure her from being a zombie. When Liv eats a brain, she gains random memories and traits from the people she eats. She uses these abilities to help with any murder cases currently being solved in town.

Liv is a person who’s regaining what it means to be alive. As a zombie, she had lost her emotions and passion for living. She used to be a strong willed woman, and her mother has no problem constantly reminding her of that. Despite this, as she learns more about herself now (and the person she used to be), she realizes that she can be happy even as a zombie. She has a respectable job, she’s still friends with her ex-fiancé, and she helps solve homicide cases. Liv makes the best out of her situation, and continues to do the best she can.

I really appreciate the cast for the show. From Liv’s boss at the morgue to the main detective in the show, iZombie has a diverse group for their main characters. However, admittedly, the Asian representation has been pretty cliché. The only time an Asian character has been in the show, they’ve been a part of a street gang and known martial arts. The icing on the cake was when the street gang happened to own a video porn shop where they would meet each other for business reasons. Seeing how iZombie handled having a Black cop and an Indian doctor without demeaning the characters or resorting to stereotypes, I don’t see how it couldn’t have had Asian characters without being ridiculous.

Dr. Ravi Chakrabarti (Liv's boss) on the left, Liv Moore, and Detective Clive Babinaux on the right.

Dr. Ravi Chakrabarti (Liv’s boss) on the left, Liv Moore, and Detective Clive Babinaux on the right.

But what I love about the show is how they integrate current problems into the plot. One line of dialogue that surprised me recently was from a reporter during a police briefing. The police were focusing on the murder of a teenage girl who died before giving birth, and the reporter asks, “So it’s ‘all hands on deck’ for the upper-middle class white girl who’s already dead, yet you won’t assign even one detective to look into the missing kids from Nine Trolls Skate Park?”. Throughout the show, many teenagers (among whom were numerous Black males) have been disappearing, but there had been no mention of the police taking any action to find them. It’s not only a racial issue, but an issue between police being less eager to help those who’re under middle class. Topics like these are talked about all the time online (or at least on social media), and they’ve been gaining ground in the mainstream news as well. It’s nice to see that the show isn’t afraid of touching on serious topics.

The show can be crude with its humor at times (borderline sexist, recently), but despite this, overall, it’s worth a watch. If your queue is running low, I’d definitely recommend checking out iZombie for yourself! Have any opinions about the show? Do you recommend any other shows? Feel free to comment below!


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This entry was posted in Horror, opinion, Racial Issues, Reviews, sexism, tv show and tagged , , , , , , by MarchHareMoe. Bookmark the permalink.

About MarchHareMoe

Hey everyone, I'm MarchHareMoe, or Moe for short! My interests always change, but I'm always checking out new music, indie games and anime. My prime past time is plowing through the Phoenix Wright series! I have a passion for strange and mysterious mediums like the movie, "The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus", and the anime "Higurashi no Naku Koro ni" (When the Cicadas Cry). Though I'm agnostic, I've been lucky enough to have a loving Wicca as my god-mother, and have learned different New Age and Neo Paganism philosophies on my own. I'm not a writer by trade, but I'm ready to stretch my writing arm out and help the cause!

5 thoughts on “My Current Choice for Stimulating Brain Food: The Television Series iZombie

  1. Uhm, isn’t Clive’s lieutenant (the one under Blaine’s control) Asian as well? He wasn’t stereotypical, was he? And he’s been getting some decent characterisation, even if he’s a minor character.

    • Thanks for pointing that out. I completely forgot about Lieutenant Suzuki, hopefully he’ll be in more episodes.

      • I’m just hoping they’ll have him turn against Blaine. (preferably without killing him off) You’d think that now that he knows that Liv is a zombie, that he’d try and at least contact her for an alternative source for brains. Even if Blaine could still blackmail him over the help he’s given him in the past.

  2. Your whole opening:
    “iZombie is surprisingly progressive, in a strong but subtle way. The cast is diverse in a respectful manner, and the plot touches on racial issues in the media. The main protagonist is an independent woman, without having to prove herself. iZombie may not be the most intense show, but it’s clever, civil, and it covers modern problems in an entertaining way.”

    That reminds me so much of what one could say about Veronica Mars, which the guy who created iZombie also created. 😉 I haven’t checked out iZombie yet, but it’s good to know his show here is keeping up that tradition of being awesome.

    As I read more of your description of what the show is, I realize it reminds me of a lot of shows about Life & Death that I’ve loved — Pushing Daisies, Dead Like Me, etc. 😉

    I want to check out this and that other CW show Jane the Virgin when I get a chance. 😉 I do. This one wasn’t really on my list because I’m not a huge fan of zombies but I think you’ve managed to change my mind. I’ll at least want to give it a chance. 😉

  3. Pingback: Sexualized Saturdays: The Curious Case Of Transferable Sexuality in iZombie | Lady Geek Girl and Friends

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