Of Fire and Stars‘s Princess Romance is Good, but Not Great

(via Goodreads)

(via Goodreads)

Fandom has recently come to celebrate the month of February as Femslash February—an open call to all ficcers, vidders, and other creative participants to make fanworks that feature women who love women. Usually this is the month where I try and find a good femslash fic or two to read and rec, but I’m kind of in between fandoms right now, and I didn’t know where to start. Fortunately, though I didn’t find a fanwork, I did stumble across Of Fire and Stars, a YA novel by Audrey Coulthurst which was surprisingly about two princesses who fall in love with each other. Although I didn’t love all of it, the queer romance at the heart of this book was incredible and definitely deserves a rec.

Minor spoilers after the jump!

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Fanfiction Fridays: the sharp edge of survival by with_the_monsters

Massive spoiler alert: everyone dies at the end of Rogue One. (That’s okay to say now, right?) The rebel crew, after a long-fought battle on Scarif, get the plans for the Death Star out to Leia Organa, but are all killed in the destruction of the planet. It makes sense from a storytelling perspective; if Jyn, Cassian, and everyone else were good enough to survive Scarif, it wouldn’t make any sense if we didn’t see them fighting alongside Luke and Leia in the original movies. So they had to die. However, if you, like me, left the movie asking yourself “did they really have to die, though???” today’s fanfic is for you.

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Web Crush Wednesdays: Unboxing with Dylan Marron

These days we spend a lot of time talking about abstract concepts like toxic masculinity and rape culture, and whether discussing them in the realm of politics or in a more geeky way as we do on this site, we rarely spend any time defining these terms or arguing with people who say that these concepts aren’t real. Fortunately, for people who want to either understand these concepts a little better or who want real-world examples of how these concepts work, there’s the internet. Today’s web crush is for people who want to laugh and educate themselves on intangible concepts at the same time.

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Three Dark Crowns Raises Expectations with Nothing to Show for It

I was at my local library recently, just browsing the shelves, when one particular book caught my attention. It was called Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake, and it had the most interesting premise of any book I’ve come across this year. The flap copy alone had me racing to check it out and take it home. So imagine my disappointment when Three Dark Crowns turned out to be not only nothing like what I had been advertised, but also just a generally poorly-written story.

Major spoilers below the jump!

(via goodreads)

(via goodreads)

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The Second Season of Voltron: Legendary Defender is Way Better Than Expected

The second season of Voltron: Legendary Defender came out on Jan 20th, the same day as Inauguration Day here in the States, and like many others, I wanted to watch it in lieu of watching the inauguration. But I ended up watching the ceremony with my family, and then I made the decision to go get drunk instead of binge-watching Netflix. (Note: We at LGG&F do not formally advocate getting drunk as a coping mechanism, even if one’s country is crumbling into a pile of orange Cheeto dust.) However, I’ve now finished the series, and I’m happy to report that I liked it a great deal more than I thought I would, given my lukewarm review of the first season.

Massive spoilers below!

From left to right: Hunk, Allura's aide Coran, Allura,

From left to right: Hunk, Allura’s aide Coran, Allura, Lance, Keith, Shiro, and Pidge. (via technobuffalo)

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Web Crush Wednesdays: The Sad Asian Girls Club

webcrush picChinese New Year is coming up (this Saturday), and while I’m happy to celebrate it, I also often wonder about what non-Asians get out of Chinese New Years celebrations. There are always inevitably a good number of non-Asians who come to Chinese New Years celebrations and, presumably, enjoy the food and performances of traditional Chinese dances. But do they continue to learn more about Asian culture and the issues that Asians face after they leave the celebration? I’m pretty sure they don’t. However, not all is lost—there are many great websites out there discussing Asian activism. Today’s web crush is one such website which focuses specifically on the work of Asian women.

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Netflix’s A Series of Unfortunate Events is a Faithful, but Inconsistent, Adaptation

I’m of rather mixed feelings about Netflix’s newest original series, A Series of Unfortunate Events. If I take it at face value, it’s a very faithful adaptation of the book series, and it’s honestly an enjoyable way to spend eight hours. Neil Patrick Harris does a fantastic job as Count Olaf, and slips into and out of each of Olaf’s disguises with a whimsical flair that makes the unfortunate events of the series seem drearily entertaining rather than just dreary. Though it seems at times darker than the book series, much of the acting is clearly meant for a children’s demographic, as the characters go through the plot reveals with all the suspense of a Scooby-Doo-esque “I would have gotten away with it too if it weren’t for you meddling kids!” And the runtime, though a little bloated, allows a lot of time for the adult actors to make their shenanigans funny. I really enjoyed watching this series. However, in adapting the book series to Netflix, a few things were expanded on that ended up making the story’s internal logic a little, well, unfortunate.

Spoilers for the series (and some mild spoilers for the books) after the jump.

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