Games for Girls: The Importance of Amnesia

Recently, something with a potentially important impact on my life has occurred. No, it’s not the announcement of the final Dragon Age: Inquisition DLC (although I am literally still screaming from the PAX trailer, and will be until it comes out on the 8th), but it does have to do with video games.

As many of us in the gaming sphere are well aware of by this point, the culture surrounding video games isn’t always welcoming to its ladies, both in and outside of the games themselves. From lady characters getting shafted in the name of more male exposure (re: Ubi’s ignoring of Assassin’s Creed: Syndicate’s Evie at E3) to pathetic attempts to silence the ever-growing voice of the female gaming community, there’s a lot of shit to sift through. Arguably, progress has been made over the last decade, but I think the recent release of a certain game on Steam could be a sign of even more positive progress in the inclusion of lady gamers. Last week, otome game fans rejoiced as Idea Factory was finally able to release a fully translated version of their game, Amnesia: Memories.

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Manga Mondays: Blank

Amnesia is an issue that’s tackled quite often in manga, whether it be through subplot or the main plot, and usually it’s trite as hell. When this convention shows up, it’s usually safe to assume that the memory loss will stay long enough for the characters to suffer a breakdown, but the memories will all somehow return at the end of the story / arc so that there can be a happy resolution. Wanting a happy ending isn’t something to be faulted for, and even writing something about the mysterious healing powers of love, while usually uninteresting, isn’t something to get angry over. However, the mention of memory loss in a romance carries with it the warning of tired tropes that don’t endear a work to me. It’s no wonder that when I read that Furiko Yotsuhara’s Blank dealt exclusively with the issue, I wasn’t overly excited to read it. And how was it? Eeh.

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