Magical Mondays: Magical Birds and Where to Find Them

harry-potter-hedwig

(via PlayBuzz)

Harry Potter has indisputably become an important part of our modern mythos about witches, wizards, and magical know-how. We’ve discussed the series a lot on this blog, but as I was randomly thinking the other day, what exactly prompted Rowling’s choice in animal companions for her young magic users? Creatures like toads and cats have long since been staples of witchiness in the current pop media consciousness (although as far as cats go, Hermione’s fluffy ball of grump Crookshanks isn’t exactly the stereotype), and rats kind of fit in by virtue of so many people having an aversion to them. But owls? From where I stood, owls seemed like a random choice. Rowling has stated that she chose the creatures because they’re “traditionally associated with magic” and just because she likes them—both valid points—but in my pop culture experience, owls aren’t the go-to bird for shorthand magical implication. No, that honor goes to ravens. Still, this got me thinking further: what are the symbolic differences between owls and ravens when it comes to magic? Surprisingly, their purpose in folklore and their general symbolism are quite similar.

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Throwback Thursdays: Zoo Tycoon

Well, originally, this was not the Throwback I had planned for today, but after watching Jurassic World, I’ve found my interest in dinosaurs reinvigorated. And what better way to get my Jurassic Park kicks off than by building a park of my own filled with dinosaurs? Unfortunately, I can’t find my copy of Zoo Tycoon, and even if I could, it wouldn’t run on my current computer anyway. GOG also does not sell it, for some reason. So it looks like I’ll just have to go without for once. (My life is hard.)

Zoo tycoon 1When I was younger I used to play Zoo Tycoon daily, and I had both expansion packs, which meant that I could build my own Jurassic Park. And then, once my park had a significant amount of tourists, a fully grown T. rex, and a dozen velociraptors, like any responsible park owner, I deleted all my fences and allowed my dinosaurs to eat everyone.

Also, if you build a ditch around the park entrance, no one can escape.

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Ghibli Month: An Aside

As Ace and I have been going through these movies—some for the first time, some for a review—the trends and tropes that are specific to a particular director really start to stick out. For all intents and purposes, the more trope-y of the two directors is certainly Miyazaki, but again I feel as though that has more to do with his intended audience than his lack of creativity or inability to simply write a different story.

For a younger audience, it’s certainly easier to equate a message or a lesson with a certain set-up, and with so many of his films being about coming of age, Miyazaki had to have known that. Reading our previous review on Spirited Away, you’ll remember that I’m not particularly fond of the “everyone’s gotta be in love” trope and Ace’s peeve is the “strong females have short hair” trope (from the Princess Mononoke post); however the trope I’m going to discuss today is a little less overt and has much less to do with the perception of gender. Rather, it’s much more intertwined with the actual emotional state of growing up.

Usually, character-wise, the set-up of a Miyazaki coming of age film is laid out as follows: protagonist has lengthened exposure to one person (the friend/love interest) while strengthening familial bonds or creating bonds with their pseudo-family, then a smattering of secondary friends and acquaintances (with the ‘antagonist’ usually being a situation rather than an actual person). However, to add a dash of the fantastical even in a completely normal setting, and to set the tone of the protagonist’s maturity journey, Miyazaki employs a character that is readily found in many other forms of media: the animal sidekick.

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