Web Crush Wednesdays: Dice, Camera, Action

In the hype of larger productions and bigger fanbases, it’s all too easy to completely miss out on less spoken of productions that are equally as good. With this seeming boom of Dungeons & Dragons webshows, it perhaps comes as no surprise that they suffer from the same thing—it’s definitely easy to fall in the shadow of amazing shows like Critical Role and The Adventure Zone. So today I bring you a beginner-friendly D&D webshow starring some of my favorite YouTubers and led by Wizards of the Coast’s own DM extraordinaire, Chris Perkins. Friends, readers, dim the lights, because it’s time for some Dice, Camera, Action.

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Magical Mondays: Science or Magic? Why Not Both?

We’re big fans of both magic and science on this blog, so unsurprisingly, any time they intersect all our heads swivel in unison like prairie dogs. In the era of the Internet, 3D printing, and nanotechnology, never has science felt more like magic than it does now. While it is expected for science fiction writers to be heavily influenced by the latest inventions and the most puzzling enigmas of quantum physics, it seems that for all the incomprehensible wonders science has achieved, rarely do fantasy authors take advantage of the ever-shrinking median between technology and magic. A notable and incredibly well executed exception is Diane Duane’s Young Wizards series, which paints magic more as a slightly fanciful elaboration upon known principles of physics than as a nebulous and unexplainable form of power.

Wands that shoot lasers.

Wands that shoot lasers.

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Fangirls on Twitter: You Keep Doin’ Your Thing

Want to know what’s not new in the world? People ragging on girls liking things and the methods by which they choose to like things.

--via Giphy

—via Giphy

This old song and dance has been going on for as long as one could probably imagine, and we’ve all been witness to it: from the small microaggressions of people condescendingly calling girls “cute” if they express an interest in something to the more blatant, angry shut downs of those who don’t value the opinions of those who don’t fit into the typical boy’s club or adhere to their mindset. I know in my life one of the most blaring examples have been from the (slowly dying, thank god) Gamergate controversy, in which the experiences of female game fans and developers were getting talked over because the patriarchy in the gaming community might not have been as solid as sexist dudebros had come to believe. But really, it doesn’t take a fiasco like that to see what’s going on: girls have been called out as “fake geeks” ever since men decided to pretend that women didn’t like nerdy things as hard as they did. (Never will I forget being called a fake geek because I had an opinion on something about DC Comics—and I don’t even claim to be a fan of Western comics.) While these things are unfortunately expected in any sort of of group (movies, sports—it’s not limited to stereotypical geeky things), I would have hoped that at least semi-respected news outlets and the people who write on them would at least have the good sense to take a step back and consider that this kind of thing might just be a little fucked up. Unfortunately, sometimes they don’t. And just as unfortunately, sometimes we get articles like Radhika Sanghani’s, as was published on The Telegraph on August 2nd.

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Web Crush Wednesdays: The Laser Girls

webcrush picHere at Lady Geek Girl and Friends, most of our posts focus on geeky media. We hardly ever broach the techie side of geekdom. But it deserves to be talked about, because women and POC are still massively underrepresented in technological fields. When we think of techie geeks like hackers, tinkerers, and makers, we still think mainly of white men.

There are many reasons for this, but one that I’ve personally heard girls tell me is that they just aren’t that interested in technology careers. Most girls in our culture simply aren’t raised to like the hard edges and so-called ugliness of the “guts” that make up the insides of our devices. So how can we get more girls interested in technology? One way is to meet them where they are, with things they’ve already been socialized to like, in order to show that there is more than one “right” way to approach technology.

Enter today’s Web Crush: The Laser Girls. They 3D print acrylic and metal fingernails. Yeah, you read that right.

The Laser Girls

The Laser Girls, Sarah Awad and Dhemerae Ford

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Theatre Thursdays: King Kong, the Ape’s Alive!

Hi there! PolyglotPisces here, and I’m overjoyed to be writing my very first post for Lady Geek Girl and Friends. I would like to take this time to introduce the theatre-loving world to a spectacle that somehow has evaded my notice until recently, despite opening months ago. And should this article strike your interest, make haste: the show closes in less than two weeks. Drum roll, please.

Ladies and gents, the World’s Eighth Wonder!
Now on stage in the great Down Under!

(See how that rhymed? That was fun.)

King_Kong_(musical)_logoYes, true believers and unbelievers, that’s right: King Kong Live on Stage. I don’t know about you, but I have definitely felt the void in my own life from the lack of gigantic animatronic apes on the musical theatre stage. Luckily, other people out there have felt it too, and they did not stop until they did something about it. The creative forces behind this musical include: music by Marius de Vries, lyrics by Michael Mitnick and Craig Lucas, and book by Craig Lucas, and also some additional music from contemporary musicians. After five years of pre-production work, King Kong opened in the Regent Theatre in Melbourne, Australia on June 15, 2013, with Carla Pavlovic as producer, Daniel Kramer as director and John O’Connell as choreographer.

The show is an adaptation of the 1933 film King Kong, directed and produced by Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack, and written by James Ashmore Creelman and Ruth Rose. (Who knew that one of the most iconic films of all time was co-written by a woman? Especially in 1933! #girlpower #readwomen2014.) Continue reading